The cruelty of the colonial times in houseboy by ferdinand oyono

Toundi refers to this man as his master and holds him in high praise. This affection for Father Gilbert is known as European paternalism which is the theme displayed throughout the novel grahambaden.

The cruelty of the colonial times in houseboy by ferdinand oyono

Jul 17, Henry Ozogula rated it it was amazing This novel, which was written decades ago is haunting and very powerful, evoking the colonial situation in black Africa in the past.

It is very funny and very sombre and sad at the same time. Toundi believes great vistas are opening up for him by being the houseboy of one of the white colonial administrators. The author brilliantly e This novel, which was written decades ago is haunting and very powerful, evoking the colonial situation in black Africa in the past.

The author brilliantly explores the whole scenario, evoking the raw basic humanity in people across colours and race. Here we have discrimination, prejudice, lust and infidelity; and the cruelty personified by the police and penal system.

As Toundi revels more and more in the white man's secrets, he seals his won doom in the process. For example Toundi is initially fascinated with the wife of his "master" more of this later but soon realises that apart from being a mere human too despite her white colour, she is actually worthless and sleeps around extravagantly.

Being aware of such a "secret" is of course dangerous though the irony is that it is no secret at all.

The cruelty of the colonial times in houseboy by ferdinand oyono

When we see Toundi's white master implying that the "boy" smells badly, it mirrors the sentiment of the black girl lover of a whiteman who complains about the smell of her white boyfriend!

Being white of course the lover boy is not too anxious to let the world know about his black girlfriend and does not trust her fidelity at all. In the end our narrator finds himself in an awkward situation though in no way culpable: There is a memorable passage in this work that reflects how much Toundi initially "worshipped" the whites; when he first meets the wife of his master and she awkwardly shakes his hand.

A shudder ran through me at the touch of her hand Her look is as warm as a ray from the setting sun It rather encapsulates Toundi as his life hurtles towards implacable disasterTo say that Houseboy is anti-colonial literature is a bit of an understatement.

Project MUSE - Colonial Violence and Psychological Defenses in Ferdinand Oyono's Une vie de boy

On one hand it is a scathing portrait of the French overlords' cruelty toward a population that they viewed as /5(8).

Ferdinand Oyono’s Houseboy is a novel written in the form of a diary. The diary, referred to as ‘Exercise Book’ belongs to a man called Toundi, who is found unconscious close to the frontier in the Spanish zone, and who later dies/5. HOUSEBOY by Ferdinand Oyono is a novel that can be read as a text depicting the most passionate denunciation of the French colonial rule in Africa.

Houseboy | yunusemremert.com

However, Oyono’s Houseboy also shows how colonial trauma extends from the individual to the larger community and two such moments are worth noting here.

The first occurs at the novel’s beginning, when the French Cameroonian who translates Toundi’s diary visits the dying man. Houseboy Houseboy Research Papers examine the book based on a diary of a young african american boy employed by a priest. Ferdinand Oyono’s novel Houseboy is written in the form of the diary of Toundi Ondoua, a young boy from Cameroon.

In many ways, the novel’s theme is simple, despite the work’s great complexity.

The cruelty of the colonial times in houseboy by ferdinand oyono

Houseboy Summary and Study Guide SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This page guide for “Houseboy” by Ferdinand Oyono includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis.

Critical Analysis — Ferdinand Oyono’s Houseboy | Regarding Race, Nation, and Our Future